Forum Posts

nafiche 123
Jun 11, 2022
In General Discussions
I believe that most people who cross-border into interaction design from other fields (industrial design, UI or other fields) have read "7 theorems of executive email list interaction design", "7 laws of interaction design", "worth it" at least once The 5 Laws of Repeated Learning". Each article of this type contains different theorems (such as "beauty is executive email list easy to use", or Gestalt theory, etc.), but the following three permanent members are definitely mentioned in every article: Fitts' Law (button size and mouse distance affect user reaction time) Hick's Law (the more options, the longer the user's reaction time) Miller's Law (the magic number 7±2 rule) These theorems are catchy, seem solid, plausible, and plentiful with working executive email list examples. But I have to say straight to the point: For students who have no training in psychology or social sciences, and who do not understand the basic working methods and research methods executive email list of interaction design, don't let the "interaction design theorem" be your first entry to interaction design. impression. This is not because these theorems are all "wrong". On the contrary, since Fitts' Law was proposed in the 1950s, it has been the top of the cross-theory executive email list of informatics and psychology for a long time, and has been verified by many subsequent empirical studies. ; and Miller's Law has been cited more than 20,000 times by 2014, and its influence executive email list cannot be far-reaching. The reason why it is not recommended for newcomers to learn the "theorem" is because of the following three reasons: 1. Oversimplification At present, there are almost no articles about "laws" in China that can explain exactly what these laws are talking about.
I Believe That Executive Email List content media
0
0
14

nafiche 123

More actions